First of all, this would be a more beautiful phone were it not for the atrocity that is 4 lenses at the back. Secondly, does it make sense to pack all these lenses on a midrange smartphone that will obviously shoot less appealing pictures compared to Google’s new Pixel 3? Funny thing I wrote this post on triple lenses just a few days ago, and here we are already onto 4 lenses.

Triple cameras on smartphones are a thing now, but for how long?

You may say the Huawei P20 Pro’s triple lens setup proves more lenses are better. But they’re only better for rankings. On DxOMark’s ranks, the P20 Pro is the leader. But that ranking is based on many different factors, never on preference and what actually just looks appealing to the human eye, if I could say so.

RELATED:  Triple cameras on smartphones are a thing now, but for how long?

samsung-galaxy-a9-four-cameras

Of what use are all these lenses? Do we really take such complicated pictures as to justify having more lenses at the back? Or, like I asked in that previous post, are companies now just adding more lenses for the fun of it? Have we reached peak innovation? By the time Google adds a secondary lens to their Pixel line of devices, Samsung, Huawei, Nokia and LG will be doing what? 10 lenses?

Let’s wait for camera review of the Galaxy A9. Hopefully, this extravagance with lenses doesn’t make it to Samsung flagships anytime soon. That setup looks ugly. I am waiting for Huawei’s Mate 20 with 4 lenses and see what new thing they have to offer. And how it will compare to the single lens on the Pixel 3.

Leave a Reply